Each of these types of jobs has its advantages and disadvantages

Comments · 92 Views

Working at a check-out desk in the library may be boring at times; however, you’ll probably get the chance to get a fair amount of your homework done. While the salary may be on the low side, the demands of the job are usually commensurate with the salary. On campus jobs also have the ad

Each of these types of jobs has its advantages and disadvantages. Working at a check-out desk in the library may be boring at times; however, you’ll probably get the chance to get a fair amount of your homework done. While the salary may be on the low side, the demands of the job are usually commensurate with the salary. On campus jobs also have the added advantage of requiring little to no commuting time.

Work-Study Earnings
While work-study is a great program to earn part of the cost of your college education, virtually no work-study program is going to get you through https://payforessay.pro/history-homework-help/ college debt-free. Work-study jobs usually pay somewhere between $6-$10 an hour (by law, every work-study job must be paid above minimum wage), with an average of 10 hours a week, and a maximum of 20 hours a week (during school semesters).

Doing the math, a minimum-paying job at 10 hours a week would earn you $840 in a 14-week semester. At the other end of the spectrum, a higher-paying job at 20 hours a week would earn you $2800 in a 14-week semester. However, not only do you https://payforessay.pro/capstone-project/ have to find a high-paying work-study job that has a maximum number of hours available each week, but you also have to be able to handle working that many hours, and have been awarded a considerable amount of work-study money in your financial aid offer.

Your financial aid offer includes a maximum amount you can earn in a work-study position. While some high-paying jobs may be available, most students are not awarded a high enough annual amount to make it into a main route to paying pay for papers for college. Most students earn more than enough to pay for gas, entertainment, food, and maybe part of the rent; being able to pay everything through a work-study salary is highly unlikely. One final benefit: work-study earnings are not counted in the next year’s calculation of eligibility for financial aid, i.e. work-study cannot raise your income into another bracket where you would be eligible for less, or no, work-study funding.

Comments